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The Frame Room Frame & Design Blog

  • Jan 03 2016

    How to Choose Picture Frame Matting

    By Kory Choosing the correct picture framing matting can be a daunting task. Not only do you want to pick out the right color, what are the different kinds, and what is acid free any? Read this to find out!Read More Read more
  • Jan 03 2016

    How to Choose Picture Mounting

    By Kory

    A first, but often confusing step in custom framing is mounting, commonly called dry-mounting, your poster, print, or other artwork. Learn about dry-mounting materials and process here.


    How to Choose Custom Framing Mounting

     

    At The Frame Room, our core philosophy is to educate and inform our customers during the picture framing decision process and empower them to make the best decision for their personal needs. For many of our customers, they are picking out framing and/or matting for a highly personal, sentimental, and valuable object. To some, they are simply framing a poster, print, sports jersey, or diploma to protect it from the elements and ravages of time. This article will help to outline the differences of the kinds of mounting we carry and shed light on their recommended uses to ensure the best job for your framing dollar.

     

    I’d like to begin by providing a little background on mounting or dry-mounting as it is commonly called? We utilize a vacuum press to dry-mount your poster, art print or other artwork to a rigid board ready for framing. This is one of the biggest differences between do-it-yourself (DIY) framing and professional framing. You've seen it, a picture in a frame that seems to be buckling, bubbling, or falling down in the frame. That won't happen to your frame piece with our technique. Furthermore, no matter how hard you you press and how evenly you think you apply pressure with spray mounting adhesives, it will bubble and it will look bad over time. Moisture and humidity are almost as relentless as gravity; the other thing dry-mounting your artwork or poster fights and wins!

     

    We offer the following mounting substrates with their description and uses:

     

    • Our standard dry-mounting. This pH neutral, but not acid free board, is great for everyday framing applications. It is available in 1/8" and 3/16" thickness.
    • Artcare Restore© reversible mounting board. This is an acid free and reversible mounting board great for valuable posters, art work, and photography. If you think you may ever sell a valuable piece or wish to reverse the mounting process, this is your board.
    • Acid free foam core with reversible, acid free, archival mounting tissue. Similar to Artcare Restore© but the board isn't coated with the adhesive, instead we use an acid free mounting tissue. A more old school solution to this problem, but still use full.
    • Black foam core mounting board. This is important...use on newspapers or two-sided documents you do not want the reverse side showing through. White foam core will allow this to happen. This black foam core is acid free and will reduce the degradation of your artwork.
    • Linen backing of posters with the acid free mounting tissue. This is a conservation technique to basically reinforce an old, brittle, or valuable document. It is widely accepted among collector of valuable vintage posters and movie posters. The more modern day acid free mounting tissue replaces the more traditional rice paper. This process was messy and frankly, i do not miss it.
    • Hanging on acid free foam core using acid free linen tape. This technique is for posters, art prints, or artwork you just don't want to mount or for diplomas with embossed seals or again, you just don't want to mount.
    • We also use hot glue and stitching methods for mounting of objects (i.e. masks) and fabric or cross stitching/needlework. Typically it is mounted on acid free board or acid free matboard.

     

    We hope you have found this article informative. This article is part of a 6 part series intended to introduce you to all the components and levels of framing. The series includes:

     

    1. Picture Frame Matting. How do I Choose?
    2. Wood or Metal Frames. How to Choose a Frame.
    3. How to Choose the Correct Picture Frame Glazing.
    4. How to Choose Custom Frame Mounting.
    5. What Exactly Does Conservation Framing Mean?
    6. What the Heck is a Shadowbox Frame Anyway?

     

    We look forward to being there to serve all of your custom picture framing needs.

     

    Read more
  • Jan 03 2016

    How to Choose Picture Frame Glazing

    By Kory Different artwork, posters, diplomas, or other framed items require different glazing, aka glass. This article will help answer the questions about clarity, UV ratings, and best glazing uses for you.Read More Read more
  • Jan 03 2016

    What exactly is Conservation Framing?

    By Kory

    It's time to frame your piece, and someone say are you going to do it up to conservation standards? Conservation framing? This article will take the mystery out to help you make your choices.


    At The Frame Room, our core philosophy is to educate and inform our customers during the picture framing decision process and empower them to make the best decision for their personal needs. For many of our customers, they are picking out framing and/or matting for a highly personal, sentimental, and valuable object. To some, they are simply framing a poster, print, sports jersey, or diploma to protect it from the elements and ravages of time. This article will sum up and answer the question; what exactly does conservation framing mean?

     

    Throughout this series of articles you've been introduced to the numerous matting, frame, glazing, and mounting options available for your custom picture frame project. In very simple terms, conservation framing is:

     

    Conservation framing is the use of techniques and materials in the framing process to protect, minimize, or stop the degrading effects of the environmental influences, i.e. sunlight, heat, humidity, and gravity, that constantly attack your framed piece. There are different levels of conservation framing, ranging from a minimum of using uv glazings and acid free mounting boards to a more through use of higher end uv or museum grade glazing, pure cotton rag mats, acid free mounting boards and the use of encapsulation. Encapsulation is a technique whereby using tape we literally seal the inside of the frame from any air actually touching your piece. Air is the enemy, as is light. We need light, but we can stop the uv. We don't need air inside your frame.

     

    That is pretty much, without the use of extreme technical jargon, what it means when during the picture framing process we refer to Conservation Framing.

     

    We hope you have found this article informative. This article is part of a 6 part series to introduce you to all the components and levels of framing. The series includes:

     

    1. Picture Frame Matting. How do I Choose?
    2. Wood or Metal Frames. How to Choose a Frame.
    3. How to Choose the Correct Picture Frame Glazing.
    4. How to Choose Custom Frame Mounting.

    5. What exactly is Conservation Framing?
    6. What the Heck is a Shadowbox Frame Anyway?

     

     

    We look forward to being there to serve all your custom picture framing needs.

    Read more
  • Jan 03 2016

    How to choose Wood or Metal Frames

    By Kory

    It's time to get your poster, art print, sport memorabilia or other piece framed and you are wondering, wood or metal frame? This article will help guide you to the best frame for you.


    At The Frame Room, our core philosophy is to educate and inform our customers during the picture framing decision process and empower them to make the best decision for their personal needs. For many of our customers, they are picking out framing and/or matting for a highly personal, sentimental, and valuable object. To some, they are simply framing a poster, print, sports jersey, or diploma to protect it from the elements and ravages of time. This article will help to outline the differences of the kinds of frames we carry and shed light on their recommended uses to ensure the best job for your framing dollar.

     

    We carry hundreds of wood and metal frames. So how do you choose?

     

    First of all, there are few rules, but the most important consideration is size and weight. You really shouldn’t choose a thin wood or metal frame for pieces over approximately 11" x 14" inches. Our professional designers will help you pick out a frame that can support the weight of your finished piece while proportionally matching the framed work.

     

    With that stated, we normally ask, do you prefer wood or metal? Queue, "I don't know." Let's cover some basic differences.

     

    • Weight - Metal is typically lighter, but this is marginal.
    • Strength - While metal is stronger, the difference isn't really a factor in the decision.
    • Finishes - Wood offers a much greater variety of finishes from gold leaf, antique, weathered, ornamental, and many more. Metals are typically anodized colors or brushed Florentine matte finishes but have added some more ornate styles as the production methods have improved. Wood frames have a great advantage in this field and is a primary reason they are by far the more popular framing material.
    • Price - Until about 3 years ago metal was typically 20-30% cheaper. Metal frames were a great cheap frame option. Then the price of the commodity aluminum, the material used to product metal frames, went up and seemingly overnight the price playing field was leveled. Now, through the proliferated use of sustainable forestry and production practices wood frames are the best option based on price. All our wood frames are from sustainable forests in line with our corporate belief in conservation and stewardship of our environment.

     

    This can serve the criteria to begin your decision, but at the end of the day you'll choose the best frame to your picture based on finish, color match, artwork composition match, and size proportionality. Our frame design professionals will be there every step of the way to help in your decision.

     

    We hope you have found this article informative. This article is part of a 6 part series intended to introduce you to all the components and levels of framing. The series includes:

     

    1. Picture Frame Matting. How do I Choose?
    2. Wood or Metal Frames. How to Choose a Frame.
    3. How to Choose the Correct Picture Frame Glazing.
    4. How to Choose Custom Frame Mounting.
    5. What Exactly Does Conservation Framing Mean?
    6. What the Heck is a Shadowbox Frame Anyway?

     

    We look forward to being there to serve all your custom picture framing needs for years to come

    Read more
  • Jan 03 2016

    What the heck is a Shadowbox Frame anyway?

    By Kory

    Jersey Frame. T-Shirt Frame. That box frame thing. All titles for the Shadowbox; the versitile, deeper souled, cousin of the traditional picture frame.


    At The Frame Room, our core philosophy is to educate and inform our customers during the picture framing decision process and empower them to make the best decision for their personal needs. For many of our customers, they are picking out framing and/or matting for a highly personal, sentimental, and valuable object. To some, they are simply framing a poster, print, sports jersey, or diploma to protect it from the elements and ravages of time. This article will help to outline the basics of shadowboxing in order to beautifully display and preserve your dimensional objects.

     

    Shadowboxes represent a specific type of framing where an object is enclosed in a dimensional frame creating a striking display as well as an enclosed preservation environment for the object. Most often people are accustomed to seeing sports memorabilia such as sports jerseys mounted in a shadowbox, but really any object can be mounted in a shadowbox in order to display and preserve it. Objects commonly framed in a shadowbox include:

     

    • Military Metals
    • Flags (folded and unfolded)
    • Sports Memorabilia such as Event Tickets, Baseball Bats, Jerseys and Shirts
    • Children’s Art Projects
    • Travel Souvenirs like Shells and Maps
    • Asian Fans and Kimonos
    • Butterflies and Specimen Collections
    • Fishing Lures and Photos to commemorate “The Big Catch”
    • Bridal keepsakes like Veils and Garters
    • Weapons such as Antique Guns and Swords
    • Sports balls, such as signed baseballs, footballs, and basketballs.

    The options for shadowboxes far exceed basic framing because 3-D objects can be mixed with 2-D photographs or papers to create a dramatic visual result. The depth of the shadowbox also allows objects to be layered at different heights to create a dynamic arrangement within the frame. There really is no restriction to what you can display in a shadowbox. The frames are available in a wide range of depths to accommodate objects of all sizes. Whether you choose to mount a single item as a statement piece, or include several objects associated with a display theme, the visual impact a shadowbox creates can add emphasis and distinction to your presentation.
    Military retirement gifts such as folded flags can be mounted with metals or certificates of accomplishment to honor a service member’s achievements over their career. Wedding keepsakes such as veils and garters can be grouped with invitations, dried flowers or handkerchiefs to create a lasting memory of your special day or as a sentimental anniversary gift.

     

    The history of the shadowbox is usually associated with military service. Naval members would keep their belongings in a trunk that travelled with them throughout their careers and at the end of their service they would often use the worn lift out tray of the trunk to display their metals, awards and keepsakes.

     

    Modern shadowboxes are constructed similar to picture frames; they include the frame, glazing, matting, and object mountings. Frames are available in a wide range of finishes as well as depths to complement the items being displayed. Similarly, any matting can be used to highlight the displayed objects. The depth of the shadow box lends the designer the ability to place the matting against the glazing to give a "window" effect as well as against the mounting board further inside the shadowbox to create areas of focus within the display.

     

     Special consideration should be given to the glazing used in a shadowbox because light reflecting off the viewing surface (i.e glare) can greatly reduce the viewing angles, distort colors and decrease the resolution of your carefully planned display. Conservation grade glazing with <1% light reflection is the absolute best glazing for shadowboxes because it provides the highest level of protection for your valuables. By selecting Museum or UltraVue glass, known for their anti-glare/reflection properties, your shadowbox glazing will be almost invisible to viewers! In our shop, the displays of Tru Vue Museum Glass and Optimum Museum Acrylic glazings always have fingerprints on them because viewers can’t believe there really is glazing in the frame! UV protection in the glazing is also important to help preserve the objects on display. More delicate items like dried flowers and fabrics can be noticeable damaged by UV rays in a shorter period of time, so choosing a glazing with a UV defense will help further preserve the items in your shadowbox.

     

    Glazings with reduced reflection coatings (non-glare) include Tru Vue Reflection Control, Tru Vue UltraView, Tru Vue Conservation Reflection Control, Tru Vue Museum Glass, Reflection Control Acrylite, Conservation Reflection Control Acrylite, Optimum Acrylic (Anti-Reflective), Optimum Museum Acrylic (Anti-Reflective) and Optimum Museum. The chart below outlines some of the qualities of the different glazings listed above. A more in-depth description of each glazing can be found in How to Choose Picture Frame Glazing on our Learn Picture Framing Blog.

     

      Conservation grade UV protection? Percent Light Reflected back (glare) Glass or Acrylic? Benefits
    Tru Vue Reflection Control No (45%) 8% Glass Lower cost than other non-glare
    Tru Vue UltraView No (78%) <1% Glass Increased UV and greater glare reduction
    Tru Vue Conservation Reflection Control Yes (99%) 8% Glass Reduced glare with Conservation UV protection
    Tru Vue Museum Glass Yes (99%) <1% Glass Highest protection with greatest viewing clarity available
    Reflection Control Acrylite No (66%) 8% Acrylic Less risk of damage if dropped, Lightweight
    Conservation Reflection Control Acrylite Yes (98%) 8% Acrylic UV protection in lightweight acrylic
    Optimum Acrylic             (Anti-Reflective) No(93%) <1.6% Acrylic Additional Anti-static protection for charcoals, pastels, etc.
    Optimum Museum Acrylic (Anti-Reflective) Yes (99%) <1.6% Acrylic Anti-static and ideal for larger frames (>40” x 60”)

    Optimum Museum Display Acrylic

    Yes (99%) <1% Acrylic Able to be seamlessly joined with highest levels of protection

     

    We hope you have found this article informative. This article is part of a series intended to introduce you to all the components and levels of framing. The series includes:

     

    Interested in getting your piece shadowboxed? Check out our $225 Shadowbox Special. A great Shadow Box Framing special that gives you a high quality shadowbox, standard glass, black backing board, dust cover, and all hanging hardware at an incredibly affordable price.

     

    We look forward to being there to serve all of your custom picture framing needs.

    Read more
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